Thanks, Dr. Pielke!

This week Roger Pielke Sr. retired his weblog. I just wanted to thank him for the effort he had put into it. I suspect he informed and influenced far more people than he knows. I've done professional work in both sustainability and energy, and have been personally compelled to stay…

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Rebuilding After Sandy: Can We Do Better On Energy?

Over at Huffington Post my friend Bernard David asks an important question: As we rebuild after Sandy, what are we going to do different than before? Are we going to just rebuild what was there previously, or consciously decide to make changes that will reduce the impact of future natural…

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Specifying Open Climate Science: A First Attempt

In my last post, I used lessons from the open source software community and the Creative Commons effort explore what we mean by "open climate science". In this post I'm going to take the next step and propose a specification for open climate science. Finally, in the next installments I…

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Towards Open Climate Science

The events that have transpired (physically) at University of East Anglia and (virtually) around the globe have raised the important question of whether climate science is open and transparent enough. This has led, naturally, for a call for "open source" science. Personally, this discussion links two amateur passions of mine,…

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Pielke: The Australian Gambit

Roger Pielke, Jr summarizes the state of climate legislation in Australia, and speculates on what it could mean for the US. If this is the next outcome here I would think it quite positive - strengthen the renewable energy and efficiency efforts, and drop the poorly designed cap and trade…

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Last to the Figure It Out

I was just blogging on my Sun blog about how Yahoo! just dropped their plans to purchase carbon offsets because they realized they could use their expertise and the money to do smart things with their own impact, instead of paying others to reduce theirs. A couple of years ago…

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Temperature Data - "Worse than we thought"

The title may have led you to believe that the temperature is rising worse than expected, but the comment is about the data itself. The various sets of temperature data that we have to do climate modeling are not very good, especially as you go back in time. This shouldn't…

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Revkin: Looking to Ground a Broader Discussion?

Andrew Revkin's Friday Times Dot Earth piece, Study: Cool Spells Normal in Warming World talks about how climate change is communicated and understood. He starts by noting an upcoming academic publication that reinforces the point that an upward temperature trend may still have decade or two long periods without warming…

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